The Alchemist’s Eye

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I remember as a child I would stand by the creek near my house and collect the smooth, tiny pebbles from the cool water. I was very selective about it. Certain shapes, certain colors stood out to me. Where as some would see a rock, I saw a dragon, a lion, or a fish. When I was satisfied with my finds I’d put them in my pocket, take them to the little farm house we called home, and there I’d bury my treasure.

To this day I’m sure if someone were to dig between the holly tree and the tall bushes with the yellow flowers they’d find a strange pile of rocks, dirty and worthless. But for me that was treasure. Each of those stones meant something. They became tokens of memories. They represented a wonder I had for small beauty. They were products of what a big imagination could do to something that most people would overlook.

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I haven’t changed much I guess, just older now. I collect things others might see as useless and I turn it into something meaningful. One man’s trash is another man’s treasure.

I am an alchemist.

Like that child in the creek I’m always searching for something I can take and transform. A way to make the dull and mundane become interesting. I see things in shapes and colors, rather than in letters and names, and I see the potential lying there.

Maybe that’s why I became a storyteller. There’s unless territory to explore in the folds of my imagination and there is some many ostensibly worthless and mundane things I can reconstruct.

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I am an alchemist.

When others see a dirty rock in a creek, I see a handful of gold. I’m looking for the next thing to inspire me, the next thing to challenge me, the next thing I can make glitter and shine.

I’m here, not just to create, but to transform. To take it to the limits and give everyone a chance to see where the beauty lies. To show you there is greatness in the seemingly mediocre if you just add a little imagination and a whole lot of heart.

If you’re looking for beauty, you’ll find it. You’ll see where it currently is or you’ll see where it can be created. If you find it, good. If you don’t, then make it.

You’re the alchemist.

Telling Tale

The Difference Between A Storyteller and a Novelist

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I’m actually surprised by how many people don’t know the difference between telling a story and writing a novel.

Big difference.

Not to say either one is bad. Because both have their advantages and disadvantages depending on the circumstances. But they are distinctively different.

Storyteller: People with this gift tend to writing awesome short stories. They are more focused on the point, getting right to the nitty-gritty. They don’t tend to be very in depth though. You may find the characters interesting, however, you probably won’t feel overly attached.

Novelist: These people tend to fill their stories with a lot of prose and subtlety. You get a deeper, lengthier story. However, try to get a novelist to write something under 50,000 words and you might as well ask a fish to join a 5K.

I find I tend to lean more to a novelist. When writing fiction, I tend to be more abstract and thus my stories tend to be more complex. However, as I’m trying to write a few short stories, I’m struggling to keep things short and sweet.

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Keep in mind when you’re writing a novel the rules of “showing vs. telling”. It’s one of the first things you’ll learn about in the writing world. Novelist tend to show things through emotion, prose, and action, while storytellers lean more to the telling side (hence storytellers). Meaning, instead of saying “Susan kicked the door shut, the harsh slam rattling the entire house” a storyteller would simply say “Susan was angry“. Both have a time and place.

If you’re a storyteller, you have the advantage of seeing things exactly the way they are. You probably don’t bore people with a lot of poetic displays or take too long describing a thing. You give us the facts. That’s great. Sometimes I like that. If you’re a novelist, you see things in different lights, through different lenses, and incorporate what is seen through all the senses. Both are needed and both are beautiful.

It’s important to know where you strengths lie. It’s not to say a novelist can’t become a storyteller or vice versa, but it just means you may run into a few struggles along the way. Regardless, it’s your style and so it’s your story.

It’s up to you to decide how we get to see it.

Storytellers don’t show, they tell. I’m sticking with that


Ashly Lorenzana

Create a world in front of your readers where they can taste, smell, touch, hear, see, and move. Or else they are likely going to move on to another book


Pawan Mishra