The Alchemist’s Eye

Photo by Sarah Trummer on Pexels.com

I remember as a child I would stand by the creek near my house and collect the smooth, tiny pebbles from the cool water. I was very selective about it. Certain shapes, certain colors stood out to me. Where as some would see a rock, I saw a dragon, a lion, or a fish. When I was satisfied with my finds I’d put them in my pocket, take them to the little farm house we called home, and there I’d bury my treasure.

To this day I’m sure if someone were to dig between the holly tree and the tall bushes with the yellow flowers they’d find a strange pile of rocks, dirty and worthless. But for me that was treasure. Each of those stones meant something. They became tokens of memories. They represented a wonder I had for small beauty. They were products of what a big imagination could do to something that most people would overlook.

Photo by Elle Hughes on Pexels.com

I haven’t changed much I guess, just older now. I collect things others might see as useless and I turn it into something meaningful. One man’s trash is another man’s treasure.

I am an alchemist.

Like that child in the creek I’m always searching for something I can take and transform. A way to make the dull and mundane become interesting. I see things in shapes and colors, rather than in letters and names, and I see the potential lying there.

Maybe that’s why I became a storyteller. There’s unless territory to explore in the folds of my imagination and there is some many ostensibly worthless and mundane things I can reconstruct.

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I am an alchemist.

When others see a dirty rock in a creek, I see a handful of gold. I’m looking for the next thing to inspire me, the next thing to challenge me, the next thing I can make glitter and shine.

I’m here, not just to create, but to transform. To take it to the limits and give everyone a chance to see where the beauty lies. To show you there is greatness in the seemingly mediocre if you just add a little imagination and a whole lot of heart.

If you’re looking for beauty, you’ll find it. You’ll see where it currently is or you’ll see where it can be created. If you find it, good. If you don’t, then make it.

You’re the alchemist.

Top 5 Things That Drives (most) Writers Insane

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

When you think of a writer, you probably picture a frazzled woman sitting in a coffee shop typing away at her computer or a reclusive man who glares at everyone on the rare occasions he steps out of his house.

Obviously these are extreme stereotypes. There are plenty of writers who are sociable, extroverted characters. We are people too, with a plethora of personalities. So while I try not to generalize every group, I do find that there are certain interests and likes that many of us have in common.

With that said, there is also a few things that collectively most of us find obnoxious if not just absolutely detestable

1: When people ask if you’d make them a character in your story

The reason we find this annoying isn’t necessarily because we hate you nor because we think it makes you sound like a narcissist (although it kinda does) but because our story plots have to match the characters and our characters have to work with the plot. If we have to make a character based off everyone we knew/were friends with, we’d have an entire book filled with useless characters (no offense to you).

2: When people compare you to J. K. Rowling

This is true especially for authors in the sci-fi/fantasy genre. Now sometimes it’s flattering, but most times we writers aren’t trying to be the next J. K. Rowling. We’re happy letting her do her and us do us. Also, quick note: Rowling is not the only successful author out there. Just saying.

3: When you forget to save and the power goes out

Having to rewrite the same chapter over again is always frustrating. And it seldom is as good the next time you write it. Even more irritating and after you rewrite the entire thing plus more, you find out it actually did save and that you just wasted three hours of your life for no reason.

4: When you tell people you’re a writer and they say they’re also writers, but then you find out they only write fan-fiction

I don’t mean to be rude. If that’s what you like to do then go for it. But I’m just not sure if you’re an actual “writer” if you’re stealing other people’s ideas and turning them into your own. It’s even worse when these people insist you read their work and give them a review.

5: Getting a super cool idea for a dialogue or a plot twist, not writing down, and forgetting it completely

You remember the idea was good and you remember that it would have helped advance your plot. You recall where you were when you came up with it, you recall what you had for lunch that day and that one movie you watched one time at your cousin’s house when you were six but you have no clue what the really, really cool idea was. You tell yourself that next time you get an idea like that you will write it down… and then you don’t. And then it happens all over again.